Before Jake was born, I read every single book on pregnancy that I could get my hands on. I’m talking a stack of books that made my nursing school load feel like a sack of feathers (and I’ve known nurses who have permanent back injuries from nursing school tomes alone). I was a little neurotic. I had a book for everything, and read every one of them. I figured I had plenty of time to get to the books on how to actually care for a baby, and planned to save those for my last month. Well, Jake apparently didn’t get the memo that he was to hold off until I did adequate research on how to keep him alive, because he was born nearly 2 months early, a full month before I made it to my “baby manuals” stack.

Between feedings around the clock, being jolted out of my precious few hours of sleep by the shrill beeping of his heart monitor, and trying to heal from a botched up c-section myself, I was tired all the time. Way too tired to comprehend the long, drawn out, in-depth books that I tended to prefer back when I had all the time in the world. Back then, I would have given pretty much anything short of my first-born child (because that would be counterproductive) to have a book that explained what was going on in my precious bundle of joy (if joy is defined as “a baby who screams nonstop for no reason for about two months on end”) in very simple, bite-sized paragraphs. No muss, no fuss, no “let me tell you a ten page story about Sally and her baby before getting to the point.” That is exactly what Baby’s First 100 Days byMargaret Stephenson-Meere offers new parents. Simple, relevant, digestive information in less than 100 pages. Stephenson-Meere is a registered nurse and a midwife in both Australia and the UK as well as a mom to four boys and a grandmother, so she has plenty of knowledge to share with new parents.

Baby’s First 100 Days provides new parents with advice on everything from why their baby is crying to how to get him to sleep through the night. She also focuses on the holistic approach to dealing with issues, such as colic or inability to burp, and cites Eastern philosophies to support her advice. The book even had a section on just having fun with your baby, something that is often left out of other massive tomes. I thought that was a really nice touch, because they really are only young once, and even if they are screaming for a good 14 hours a day for a few months, we really should grab as much joy as we can out of raising our children before they grow up, move out, and have children of their own.

Check out the other blogs on the Baby’s First 100 Days Blog tour, as some will be hosting giveaways.