Think men always out-earn women? Not always! While men still make more than women overall – the Bureau of Labor Statistics says that, generally speaking, women earn 81 cents to every dollar a man makes – there are many women out there in the right careers for bringing home a bigger bag of bacon than their male counterparts.

Teaching

Teaching tends to be a female dominated field, and experts suggest that women educators earn more than men because they are more likely to hold senior leadership positions. No matter the reason, women earn 105% of what men doing the same job earn; salaries depend on the grade level, subject, and geographic area, but average between $47,000 and $51,000 per year. In every state, teachers need to have a minimum of a bachelor’s degree, generally in education or the subject they teach, and must pass state specific exams in teaching and subject knowledge. School administrators generally need to hold a master’s degree or doctorate in educational administration or a similar subject.

Occupational Therapy

In this female-dominated field, therapists work with patients who have a chronic condition or injury to help them complete their daily activities successfully. In this well-paying field, which generally requires a minimum of a bachelor’s degree in occupational therapy or a related field, women earn slightly more than men, with average annual salary near $60,000. In addition, all states require occupational therapists to hold a license, which requires completing a training program and passing an exam.

Food service

From bartenders and wait staff to pastry chefs, women in food service bring home more cash than men. Bartending is tied in terms of the number of men and women holding those jobs – but women earn 111% of their male counterparts—possibly because women tend to get bigger tips. This translates into almost $40 per week more on average. And although there are slightly more men working as bakers than there are women, women earn on average $20 per week more than men. Higher-paying food service jobs often require a degree or certificate in a culinary related field.

Technicians

In all science fields – health, life, and physical—technicians work with physicians and researchers to handle the materials being studied. These professionals, who generally must have at least an associate’s degree in science, math or a related field, plus specialized training if necessary, earn slightly more than their male peers; technicians with a bachelor’s degree or higher generally earn even more. Female scientific technicians earn a median of $38,0000 per year, 102% of what men in comparable positions make.

Dieticians and Nutritionists

More women than men work with hospitals, schools, government agencies and individuals to educate about food and develop healthy eating plans – and they earn slightly more as well. On average, female dieticians and nutritionists make $40,000 – $500 more per year than their male peers. The highest earners in this field have at least a Bachelor’s degree in nutrition, with many holding an advanced degree in the subject.

Construction

While construction is typically a male-dominated field, women actually earn more than their male counterparts in construction maintenance and supervision, earning a median of $50,000 per year. Female painters and construction laborers also earn more than men. While laborers often receive on-the-job training, supervisors generally have a degree in business, management, architecture, or another specialized, related field, such as leadership.

Mechanic

Perhaps it’s because women are the minority, but when it comes to fixing cars and aircraft, women tend to earn slightly more than men. This field is high-paying for both sexes, perhaps due to the specialized training required. Aviation mechanics earn around $41,000 per year.

Personal Appearance

Women traditionally dominate the beauty, or personal appearance, industry; hair stylists, manicurists, make-up artists and skincare specialists earn slightly more than men in the field. Requirements for this field vary by state; most require a license, earned through specialized training and testing. Earning potential varies by job and location; at the high end, you can earn $50,000 per year or more.

Interviewers

Part of the human resources department are interviewers who screen candidates for open positions. The field tends to be dominated by women, and they earn slightly more than men doing the same job–$31,000 per year as opposed to $30,000 per year. Earning a degree in business, organizational leadership, human resources, or communication can be helpful in this field.

In the future, the pay gap in all industries is expected to close even more, especially as more women seek college degrees, gain ground in leadership positions, and enter more traditionally male-dominated field, such as finance, management and pharmacy.

 

This  article was written by Marissa Krause.  She enjoys writing about women in leadership and hopes to empower women everywhere with her articles.  She finished her Business degree this last fall and looks forward to joining the ranks of other women business leaders.